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RWD Fundamentals?
#1
Once you become RWD, it comes down to tuning, suspension, transmitter adjustments, and tires. The first time you place your RWD setup on the drift track, you would expect your car to slide through each corner. But we all know, that's unlikely to happen. So how do we solve this? Tuning involves trial & error with the ankerman, camber, toe, shocks, springs, ride height, etc.

For a newcomer to the RWD scene, how are they able to learn and understand on what each tune accomplishes? If i'm oversteering or understeering, how would a newcomer know what to adjust? Is it best to keep the ride height low? High? High up front, but low in the back?

The possibilities for all these adjustments are endless. My main point is, the RWD scene is growing, but where and how is everyone increasing their knowledge? I hope im wrong, but is there a specific youtube tutorial that explains these fundamentals? I cant read the Japanese manual off my Yokomo Type C, but from the looks of it, they dont go in depth on what each tune can benefit.

Thanks in advance for those chiming in on this topic!




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#2
I think the discussion needs to be separated according to its respective area such as suspension tuning, power tuning, weight distribution, etc. Every region in the world have different style of rc drifting.
For an example, I'm from Malaysia and generally, asian region scene is very competitive in rc drifting. In the search for the best tuning available to be able to compete and be on par with the other guys, we usually use the same kind of tires on all wheels for all cars and tune our cars based on competition rules and regulations such as weight limit and dimension of car. So it is crucial to find the extra edge you can get from fine tuning and setup of your car to compete and it is continuous act to improve the speed and angles of the car during drifting.

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#3
(04-23-2016, 10:12 PM)huntneef Wrote:  I think the discussion needs to be separated according to its respective area such as suspension tuning, power tuning, weight distribution, etc. Every region in the world have different style of rc drifting.
For an example, I'm from Malaysia and generally, asian region scene is very competitive in rc drifting. In the search for the best tuning available to be able to compete and be on par with the other guys, we usually use the same kind of tires on all wheels for all cars and tune our cars based on competition rules and regulations such as weight limit and dimension of car. So it is crucial to find the extra edge you can get from fine tuning and setup of your car to compete and it is continuous act to improve the speed and angles of the car during drifting.

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I agree on seperating each type of tuning to its own category. But my question is, how will a newcomer know exactly what to tune? If they are oversteering, how would they know exactly what to adjust? I havent seen a guide or tutorial out there that explains this.

Where i drift in California, its carpet track. No competition, the only requirements is specific tires that everyone needs to use.
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#4
Every chassis out there handles differently, and depending on the skill of the driver. But the general tuning sometimes can be adapted from real drift tuning, asking local drifters about what a modification would do to your car, and even setup from rc touring cars. There are so many sources of information.

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#5
I agree on seperating each type of tuning to its own category. But my question is, how will a newcomer know exactly what to tune? If they are oversteering, how would they know exactly what to adjust? I havent seen a guide or tutorial out there that explains this.

Where i drift in California, its carpet track. No competition, the only requirements is specific tires that everyone needs to use.
[/quote]

Maybe we can start a discussion in this thread? Where general tuning depending on situation should be discussed? So many factors can contribute to oversteering that without seeing the chassis in real life, it's quite hard to help but i think I saw a site where solution to every problems in rc drifting but I can't remember them. I'll try to look the up.

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#6
http://www.maxspeedtechnology.co.uk/foru...-settings/

This should prove to be useful on the subject of suspension and geometry setting.

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#7
(04-23-2016, 10:23 PM)huntneef Wrote:  I agree on seperating each type of tuning to its own category. But my question is, how will a newcomer know exactly what to tune? If they are oversteering, how would they know exactly what to adjust? I havent seen a guide or tutorial out there that explains this.

Where i drift in California, its carpet track. No competition, the only requirements is specific tires that everyone needs to use.

Maybe we can start a discussion in this thread? Where general tuning depending on situation should be discussed? So many factors can contribute to oversteering that without seeing the chassis in real life, it's quite hard to help but i think I saw a site where solution to every problems in rc drifting but I can't remember them. I'll try to look the up.

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[/quote]

Yeah, if we can all come together as a community to create the ultimate RWD guide, that would be very helpful to current and future members. The RWD community will grow and become stronger.
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#8
(04-23-2016, 10:25 PM)huntneef Wrote:  http://www.maxspeedtechnology.co.uk/foru...-settings/

This should prove to be useful on the subject of suspension and geometry setting.

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Havent read this yet, but it looks like an amazing guide! Good share!
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#9
The MST forum article does a good job of explaining several important concepts to those who might not be familiar with them. Just keep in mind some of the latter sections are not applicable because they are written with the CS-driver in mind.

I will say this, practice your figure-eights and holding a drift around a cone. An important part of tuning a car is being able to consistently drive it so that you have a baseline to start with.

-Vic
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#10
Yeah, the mst site is based on cs style but some of them can still be used as tuning guide for those who still does not know.

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