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What's your way of weighing and balancing?
#1
How do you guys weigh and balance your chassis?

How do you know when to add more lead weights on the front than the rear or vice versa?

Is there a standard number we should be hitting when having that perfect weight & balance?




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Founder of SOCAL-RC.com.
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#2
(03-13-2016, 06:43 PM)SICKwidIT Wrote:  How do you guys weigh and  balance your chassis?

How do you know when to add more lead weights on the front than the rear or vice versa?

Is there a standard number we should be hitting when having that perfect weight & balance?




Sent from my iPhone

for weighing I use a G-Force corner weight scale. 
You can also get the Sky RC version which is cheaper. 
Now as for weight, I try to keep my chassis as light as possible for carpet as any weight increase traction by a lot. 
For asphalt, I'm still searching for optimal setup but you should always keep weight as a last resort when tuning. 
There are not set numbers on what is optimal either so it's all a personal preference. 
I usually find myself adding slight weight upfront (30/60g max) to increase traction during braking. This usually help correct under steer on slippery surfaces. 
Hope that helps a little :)
>> For 3D printed Weight Shift products and more checkout www.oversliders.net <<
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#3
You can also use four cheap Kitchen Food Scales :)
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#4
(03-14-2016, 08:48 AM)chemic Wrote:  You can also use four cheap Kitchen Food Scales :)

Thx for this suggestion. When using the scales what exactly am i trying to do?

I understand i place each wheel on a scale but what exactly is my goal?


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Founder of SOCAL-RC.com.
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#5
(03-14-2016, 01:31 PM)SICKwidIT Wrote:  
(03-14-2016, 08:48 AM)chemic Wrote:  You can also use four cheap Kitchen Food Scales :)

Thx for this suggestion. When using the scales what exactly am i trying to do?

I understand i place each wheel on a scale but what exactly is my goal?


Sent from my iPhone

Adding each corner weight will give you your chassis overall weight. 
Dividind the total weight of both rear scale by the total weight of the chassis will give your weight bias ratio
for example my total weight of chassis is 1172g, my rear is 630g this equal 630/1172=0.53 so 53% rear heavy.
Your chassis weight balance is 47% front 53% rear. 
Then from corner to corner you can do the same to see your weight balancing from side to side. 
Let's say your rear left is 300g and the rear right is 330g. You know your total rear weight is 630, so 300/630=0.47 or 47%.
This means your balancing is 47% rear left 53% rear right. 
Depending on what kind of weight ratio you are looking for, you can add accordingly. Eventually you want your side to side to be as close as possible to 50/50 ratio to avoid torque steer. Front to back is totally up to your driving exprience. 
By the way I tottaly pulled these numbers out of my butt, you will experience much different numbers on your chassis. 
For example, my Hikotech Bianca is 1550g, while my RE-R is almost 1800g.
>> For 3D printed Weight Shift products and more checkout www.oversliders.net <<
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#6
(03-14-2016, 03:27 PM)Tiger.T Wrote:  
(03-14-2016, 01:31 PM)SICKwidIT Wrote:  
(03-14-2016, 08:48 AM)chemic Wrote:  You can also use four cheap Kitchen Food Scales :)

Thx for this suggestion. When using the scales what exactly am i trying to do?

I understand i place each wheel on a scale but what exactly is my goal?


Sent from my iPhone

Adding each corner weight will give you your chassis overall weight. 
Dividind the total weight of both rear scale by the total weight of the chassis will give your weight bias ratio
for example my total weight of chassis is 1172g, my rear is 630g this equal 630/1172=0.53 so 53% rear heavy.
Your chassis weight balance is 47% front 53% rear. 
Then from corner to corner you can do the same to see your weight balancing from side to side. 
Let's say your rear left is 300g and the rear right is 330g. You know your total rear weight is 630, so 300/630=0.47 or 47%.
This means your balancing is 47% rear left 53% rear right. 
Depending on what kind of weight ratio you are looking for, you can add accordingly. Eventually you want your side to side to be as close as possible to 50/50 ratio to avoid torque steer. Front to back is totally up to your driving exprience. 
By the way I tottaly pulled these numbers out of my butt, you will experience much different numbers on your chassis. 
For example, my Hikotech Bianca is 1550g, while my RE-R is almost 1800g.

Bro.. youre awesome for this, thanks! I totally understand and see it now.  Is there some kind of rule of thumb, to aim for a specific number depending on surface?
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#7
Thanks :)
There are no real rule of thumbs for weight, but what I can tell you is that you don't want to be too heavy if you run on carpet as every bit of weight increase traction by a lot. Most carpet chassis I built were between 1400 to 1600g. I have seen some as heavy as 1700 and some as light as 1350 too. 

As for hard surface like concrete and asphalt, you can add weight up to 1800/1900 but you want to make sure you put the weight in the proper spot. For slippery surface you want to add traction so weight should be applied to control arms rather than the chassis itself. 

Again these are very subjective, I really insist on you trying your own thing until you are happy with how the car drives. Weight is only one part of the equation to a well balanced chassis. Suspension and Steering geometry are the other two massive chunk you really have to focus on ;)
>> For 3D printed Weight Shift products and more checkout www.oversliders.net <<
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#8
Yeah. Weight is only one part of the equation to a well balanced chassis. i also use my weight scale to do so.
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